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Notes on Oriental Rugs by Barry O'Connell

Uzbek Rugs: Uzbek Rug, Central Asia, late 19th century

Guide to Uzbek Rugs & Textiles

The Uzbek split from the Mongol Golden Horde that conquered Russia in the thirteenth century. When Genghis Khan died in 1227 his empire was divided up in the great Quraltai of 1229. Jochi the eldest son was given the land furthest from the hearth, but since he had died his heirs led by Berke took from the Caucasus north into Russia and they were known as the Golden Horde. The Golden Horde or Kipchaks were led by Batu and Berke. Their younger brother Shayban, who gained acclaim in the Mongolian invasion of Hungary" split off and established the Shaybanid Horde. The distinctive nature of the Uzbek was their conversion to Islam earlier than the bulk of the Golden Horde. This gave the Uzbek a point of distinction that seperated them from other Mongols.

The next major event in Uzbek history was when Uzbek Khan converted to Islam and led the Shaybanid horde to Islam as well. The distinctive nature of the Uzbek was their conversion to Islam earlier than the bulk of the Golden Horde. This gave the Uzbek a point of distinction that seperated them from other Mongols. This caused the Shaybanid to also be called Uzbek and over time Uzbek supplanted the older name. In the later part of the 15th century the Shaybanid Horde moved into Transoxiana (Turkestan also called Turan which is today Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan.) By 1505 the Uzbeks usurped the Chagati Turks or Timurid leadership and took the land much of which they still inhabit today.

As the Uzbek took control of Turkestan, northern Afghanistan, Uzbekistan and parts of Khorasan this did not mean that the indigenous people of the area left or were killed. Many of the subjugated peoples of that area primarily Sart and Turkic were absorbed into the Uzbek. Other peoples such as the Turkmen kept their ethno-linguistic identity.

Linguistically Uzbek is a Turkic language. Uzbek is linguistically close to Turkmen (Eastern Azeri). For political purposes Russian scholars worked to accentuate the differences to divide the Turkic peoples for the Soviet political purposes. Uzbeks weave both pile and flatweaves. Much of Uzbek rug production I feel is incorrectly labeled as Turkmen rugs. We see that in many rugs that prior to 1990 would have been cataloged at auction as Ersari, Afghan, or Turkmen which are not labeled Uxbek.

Guide to the The Uzbek Julkhyr

A Julkhyr is a long pile coarsely woven rug sleeping rug woven in Uzbekistan and the Uzbek north of Afghanistan. The are similar in use and construction to old Gabbehs.

The Okbash

These are generally called tent pole covers. Now and then other uses such as cup holders are ascribed to these. Spelling and pronunciation are debated as well but not convincingly.

Ikat: Central Asian Ikat Coat 19th century

Ikat: Silk Velvet Ikat Robe Central Asia mid-19th century

Ikat: The Wertime Central Asian Ikat from Uzbekistan 19th century

Notes on Abr silk

Uzbek Abr (Ikat) Silk Cover

Some articles related to the Uzbek

A Seated Uzbek Princes

Portrait of an Uzbek Nobleman 1557

Yusof-O Zolaykha of Jami. 1566. Bukhara 1566 This piece is from Uzbek Bukhara. In this period the Turkmen were vassals of the Uzbek Khan.

The "doksan iki boy ˘zbek" Ninety-two Tribe Uzbek

Turkmen Clothes and Weapons Circa 1600

Modern Uzbek Tribal Structure

Notes on Juma Namangani

Paksoy's BASMACHI (BASMATCHEVO) MOVEMENT AND Z. V. TOGAN

Portrait of an Uzbek Nobleman 1557

Notes on Oriental Rugs by Barry O'Connell

Copyright Barry O'Connell 2004 - 2007.
Last revised: November 20, 2009.

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