More Rug Notes by Barry O'Connell

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - B

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - A

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - B

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - C

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - D

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - E

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - F

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - G

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - H

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - I

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - J

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - K

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - L

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - M

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - N

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - O

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - P

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - Q

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - R

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - S

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - T

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - U

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - V

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - W

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - X

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - Y

Guide to My Notes on Oriental Rugs - Z

Bakhtiari

Bakhshaish Carpets

Bailey, Julia

Baluchestan Province

Barmakid and the Barmak Family

  • The history of the barmakids:
    Khalid bin Barmak, who was born in A.H. 87/A.D. 705, was believed to be the son of an Arab commander. His mother, a Persian slave girl, had been taken into the harem after the seizure of Balkh by the Arab armies, and the boy was later to be integrated into the Abbasid court and "adopted" by the Caliphal family. Whether or not this is historical fact, it is recognised that royal favour at the Abbasid court was often expressed in the form of "adoption" into the Abbasid household. This was the true path to power and prestige regardless of racial origins, and the Barmecide family is a peerless example of the tradition.

    Khalid bin Barmak played an important role in the formation of the Abbasid Empire. He is chronicled in The History of al-Tabari rallying together the disparate Shi’a groups of Iran, fostering support for the revolutionary movement and leading armies into battle alongside the legendary commanders of the age. Later, once Abbasid power was firmly established, Khalid was to play a key role in the government of the Empire. In the year A.H. 132/A.D. 749 he was made chief of the Landtax Bureau, remaining in that position for at least three years. He was directly involved in the founding of Baghdad, and is famous for protesting against the demolition of Meda'in to provide building materials for the new capital city. He is reputed to have said, "The great Iwan of the Chosroes is one of the wonders of the world", to which the Caliph al-Mansur is reputed to have replied, "It is naught but thine old love for the Persians!" (Muir 1984, p.455).

    It was after the founding of the city of Baghdad that Khalid al-Barmaki became the "righthand man" of the Caliph. He was promoted to Governor of Mosul, the previous commander being deliberately deposed by al-Mansur to make way for al-Barmaki. Khalid was later entrusted with the protection of the young Harun al-Rashid. At Harun's first campaign to the Bosphorus in A.H 156/A.D. 772, it was Khalid al-Barmaki who accompanied the youthful prince.

    Harun al Rashid’s continued reliance upon the Barmaki family would eventually lead to their downfall, but for many years Khalid’s heirs basked in the glory of the Caliph's favour. Khalid’s son Yahya was tutor to the young Prince Harun, whilst his grandson al-Fadhl was even suckled simultaneously with Harun by the Caliph’s consort. Later Yahya was to be made wazir, a position he retained for seventeen years, a period sometimes referred to as "the reign of the Barmakids." Even the office of the seal was soon under Yahya’s control. In the year A.H. 176/A.D. 792, al-Fadhl, who also proved to be a consummate politician, was made governor of Khurasan whilst his brother Dja’far was made governor of the Western provinces. Thus control of the vast Abbasid Empire was effectively divided between the two Barmakid brothers.

    The rapid collapse of Barmakid authority astonished their contemporaries, and no satisfactory explanation has been suggested for their fall from grace and subsequent execution. It is highly likely, however, that the extent of their power troubled the Caliph who may have come to resent and fear their influence. Akhbar i-Barmakyan Gifts at the Gate, India, Mughal, Circa 1595-1600

Barry, Don

Bashian Bros. Inc.

Bassam, J. Ph.D.

  • Seyyed Jalaleddin Bassam, president of the Carpet Joint Stock Company

  • President of Iran Carpet Company as of November 2005.

  • Saturday,November 19,2005
    Dr J. Bassam the new president of Iran Carpet Company
    Dr Bassam has got PHD in Textile from Australia.He used to be deputy of Iran Carpet Research Centre and the head of group in carpet department in University. http://www.irancarpet.ir/ShowFullHtmlModule.aspx?ModuleID=457&prePage=/index.aspx

  • Persian rugs will adorn Oman's palaces: daily Tehran, April 11, IRNA
    Iran-Oman-Carpets
    Palaces in the Persian Gulf Sultanate of Oman will be adorned with fine Persian carpets, a morning daily wrote Tuesday quoting a carpet company official.

    Seyyed Jalaleddin Bassam, who is president of the Carpet Joint Stock Company, said that his company had received orders for nine carpets for Oman's palaces as quoted by the English-language `Iran Daily'.

    He said the sales order is worth USD 440,000 for a total of 250 square meters of fine handwoven carpets, adding that the contract has been signed officially with the government of Oman.

    "Some 45 weavers will work on the project and the carpets will be woven in the northwestern city of Tabriz," where the finest Persian carpets are produced.

    He said the company has launched an international marketing campaign to promote its products abroad, and singled out Oman as one of its longstanding customers.

    According to Iran Daily, Iran exported USD 370.5 million worth of fine rugs and carpets from March 2005 to January 2006.

    Some 67 percent of carpets sold by the company during that period went to Germany, the United States, United Arab Emirates, Italy and Japan, the daily added.

    Germany imported USD 89.6 million worth of carpets from Iran during the same period, exports to the US reached USD 67.2 million while the figures for UAE, Italy and Japan stood at USD 34.3 million, USD 33.1 million and USD 24 million, respectively, according to the article.

    It further said Iran exported a total of USD 248 million worth of rugs to the five afore-stated countries.

    The figure is 10 percent higher compared to the figure released for the same period in the previous year, it added.
    http://www.irna.ir/en/news/view/menu-237/0604115739135101.htm

Bendas, Nick and Dianne

Berke

Berkey, Jonathan P.

Bessarabian Kelim

  • Flatwoven rug made in a part of the Ukraine that once was part of Romania.

Bier Carol

Blackmon, James.

Blau, Doris Leslie

The Aija Blitte Collection Torba

Bonhams & Butterfields

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Borch, Gerard ter

Borchelu Rugs

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Copyright Barry O'Connell 2004 - 2006.
Last revised: October 19, 2006.